3 ways to find your next favorite book

With 130,000,000 books in the world, how do you find the one that will capture your interest?

Sometimes I feel overwhelmed by how many life-changing, thought books there are out there that could entertain me, expand my thinking and change my life, as so many books have. How am I going to make sure I find all of the ones I’d love? Let’s call it bookworm anxiety, shall we?

Here are a few ways to combat bookworm anxiety and find your next favorite read:

1. Personalized reading recommendations: Simply fill out an online form provided by your local library and a real-life librarian will find a list of books matching your interests. I’ve found some of my favorite books this way. If your library doesn’t offer official personalized recommendation lists, don’t be afraid to ask a librarian for recommendations. That’s what they’re there for!

2. Good Reads: Whenever you come across a book you’d like to read, add it to your “to read” shelf on Good Reads to keep track. Also, search highly-rated books on likeminded friends’ accounts.

3. WhatshouldIreadnext.com: Simply put in the title or author of a book you loved and you’ll get a list of similar books that you’ll probably dig.

I love talking wordy (obviously), so feel free to ask me for some of my recommendations!

Favorite romantic reads

I’m a sucker for romantic novels. In lieu of Valentine’s Day, here is a pile I’ve added to my favorites list over the years. I’d love to know yours!

At the top of the list are some classic regency novels, because when it comes to romance, nothing beats those in my romantic-in-the-wrong-century opinion.

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Books are better: 6 ways to encourage kids to choose books over technology

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“If children enjoy reading, they will be more apt to continue to read as teenagers and as adults,” says Joella Peterson, children’s services manager at Provo City Library. (Photos courtesy of @heatheranncreates)

 

With all of the fun games and apps available to kids today, its no surprise reading often takes a backseat.

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