Giving up on mom-perfection

Can we all agree that being a good mom doesn’t have a specific look? Like the thrift store jeans in “The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants,” motherhood looks a little different on all of us.
Can we all agree that being a good mom doesn’t have a specific look? Like the thrift store jeans in “The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants,” motherhood looks a little different on all of us.

 

I wanted to be that mom. You know the one. She makes homemade fruit snacks. Her kids are always sporting the trendiest clothes and the cutest hairstyles. She sews skirts and headbands. She’s heavily involved in her kids’ classrooms. She throws extravagant, themed birthday parties. She bakes fresh bread for everyone who moves into the neighborhood. She’s the “Yes girl!” You can always count on her to take on any and every project she’s asked to do. She spends blissful hours of one-on-one time with her children every day doing crafts, laughing and bonding. Her kids are never glued to a TV or an iPad. Drive-throughs and sugar? Not for her kids! Bribery and yelling? Not on her watch!

I was ready to ace the motherhood test.Read More

Getting back up

Christenson-11
Ali Middleton Photo

 

I had a conversation with a seasoned mom today about how having three kids has tested my patience more than anything. I told her that I never had temper or anger issues . . . until I had kids. I told her how frustrating it is to try to keep my cool all day—to stay positive and react calmly to all of the interruptions, demands, fights, and temper tantrums day in and day out. I told her how I am trying to stop, breathe, and think when my kids do something that upsets me or stresses me out instead of reacting like Miss Trunchbull.

But I fail. Even on my best of days, when I’m in a good mood, when I’ve gotten adequate sleep (that one makes or breaks me), and even when I have the best intentions in the world, I still consistently have moments of weakness. Moments when my reactions are far from what I want them to be. And those moments of failure make me feel like I’m in a vicious cycle of bad momness.

This mom listened patiently, with nods of empathetic understanding, before she told me something that will stay with me for a long time.

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7 tools to help you (or a loved one) through postpartum depression

MOMANDBABY

I wrote this article for Utah Valley 360. See the original post here.

 

Approximately one in seven women in the U.S. experience some form of postpartum depression (PPD), postpartum OCD or postpartum anxiety, which may be more common than PPD. And these mood disorders don’t necessarily just come right after a baby is born — they can hit up to a year postpartum. Sadly, many women suffering from postpartum mood disorders receive no help or inadequate help.

Chances are, you or someone you know has suffered or is currently suffering from a postpartum mood disorder. As part of National Maternal Depression Awareness month, I want to share these tools that will hopefully help you or someone you love get needed relief.

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